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-Include high octane/high ethanol Regular Grade fuel in EPA Tier 3 regulations.
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Home » Brazil, Carbon Capture, Farming/Growing, Feedstocks, Forestry/Wood, Indonesia, Infrastructure, Kenya, Pennsylvania, Policy, R & D Focus, Sustainability, Tanzania

Agroforestry Systems May Play Vital Role in Mitigating Climate Change

Submitted by on February 7, 2018 – 5:51 pmNo Comment

by Jeff Mulhollem (Penn State News)  Agroforestry could play an important role in mitigating climate change because it sequesters more atmospheric carbon in plant parts and soil than conventional farming, according to Penn State researchers.

An agricultural system that combines trees with crops and livestock on the same plot of land, agroforestry is especially popular in developing countries because it allows small shareholder farmers — who have little land available to them — to maximize their resources. They can plant vegetable and grain crops around trees that produce fruit, nuts and wood for cooking fires, and the trees provide shade for animals that provide milk and meat.

The researchers analyzed data from 53 published studies around the world that tracked changes in soil organic carbon after land conversion from forest to crop cultivation and pasture-grassland to agroforestry. While forests sequester about 25 percent more carbon than any other land use, agroforestry, on average, stores markedly more carbon than agriculture.

However, carbon was not stored equally in different soil levels, noted lead researcher Andrea De Stefano, a graduate student at Penn State when the study was done, now at Louisiana State University. He pointed out that the study, which was published in December in Agroforestry Systems, provides an empirical foundation to support expanding agroforestry systems as a strategy to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and mitigate climate change.

“The conversion from forest to agroforestry led to losses in soil organic carbon stocks in the top layers, while no significant differences were detected when deeper layers were included,” De Stefano said.

“On the other hand, the conversion from agriculture to agroforestry increased soil organic carbon stocks at all levels, in most cases. Significant increases were also observed in the transition from pasture/grassland to agroforestry in the top layers, especially with the inclusion of perennial plants in the systems, such as in silvopasture and agrosilvopastoral systems.”   READ MORE

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