Advanced Biofuels USA: promoting the understanding, development and use of advanced biofuels around the world.

Call to Action for a Truly Sustainable Renewable Future
August 8, 2013 – 5:07 pm | No Comment

-Include high octane/high ethanol Regular Grade fuel in EPA Tier 3 regulations.
-Use a dedicated, self-reducing non-renewable carbon user fee to fund renewable energy R&D.
-Start an Apollo-type program to bring New Ideas to sustainable biofuel and …

Read the full story »
Business News/Analysis

Federal Legislation

Political news and views from Capitol Hill.

More Coming Events

Conferences and Events List in Addition to Coming Events Carousel (above)

Original Writing, Opinions Advanced Biofuels USA

Sustainability

Home » BioRefineries, Feedstocks, Not Agriculture, Process, R & D Focus, Sustainability, UK (United Kingdom)

Scientists Figured Out How to Use London’s Huge Fatbergs for Good

Submitted by on August 6, 2018 – 7:18 pmNo Comment

by Yasmin Tayag (Inverse)  Who says a rock-solid grease clot has to be a bad thing?  —  … The new Water, Air, & Soil Pollution paper shows how future Fatty McFatbergs (that’s what Brits named the biggest one) can be used to churn out methane — a “clean” fuel that, when burned, releases water and low amounts of carbon dioxide relative to fossil fuels. Among the many biofuels that can be made from organic waste like fatbergs, methane is a particularly practical option for large-scale production.

“Anaerobic digestion systems commonly exist in municipal sewage treatment plants,” study co-author and research associate Asha Srinivasan, Ph.D. tells Inverse. “So, it would be advantageous to make use of the existing infrastructure to produce methane.”

The greatest obstacle that scientists have run into when trying to make fatbergs useful is that they must first be broken down into useable parts, which isn’t easy to do. “In a bio-digester, microorganisms find it difficult to breakdown FOG,” Srinivasan says, referring to “fats, oils, and grease,” which comprise fatbergs. “Our process helps to breaking down FOG making it easy for the bacteria to digest and produce more methane.”

Molecularly speaking, the fats, oils and grease — or FOGs — that make up fatbergs are energy gold mines. But to be turned into fuel, they need to be broken down into components that bacteria, which are integral to the fuel-production process, can munch on. Fatbergs tend to contain antimicrobial compounds (all those hand soaps, perhaps) that have traditionally made this process difficult, and usually the FOGs have to be pretreated with other chemicals. It’s not the most efficient process, which is what we need, as fatbergs become more and more plentiful.

In the new study, the team figured out that blasting FOGs with microwaves and adding hydrogen peroxide to the chunks can help. Using their new process, the team was able to decrease the number of unusable solids in the FOG samples by up to 80 percent and release more fatty acids, which can be further broken down by bacteria to make fuel.  READ MORE

Related Post

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.