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Home » Business News/Analysis, California, Farming/Growing, Feedstock, Feedstocks, Field Crops, Infrastructure, Nebraska, Opinions, R & D Focus

GMO-Ethanol Corn Contamination Raises Concerns about Another “StarLink” Disaster

Submitted by on April 6, 2017 – 4:27 pmNo Comment

by Ken Roseboro (Huffington Post)  Food corn buyers say Syngenta’s Enogen GMO corn is contaminating non-GMO white corn fields, creating a potential “trainwreck;” may be linked to bad masa flour in California.

Enogen, a genetically modified corn for ethanol production, has contaminated non-GMO white corn grown in Nebraska that is used to make flour for tortillas and other products.

Enogen’s GMO trait was detected in the white corn using GMO strip tests, says Rovey.

He also says that flour made using his company’s white corn tested positive for Enogen last summer.

Enogen GMO corn can contaminate food corn through cross pollination in the field or improper segregation during grain handling.

When asked about contamination problems experienced by the Nebraska farmers, Syngenta claimed in a statement that it “has never had a verified incident.” The company said it has been committed to provide Enogen technology in a way that “respects other uses of the crop and other corn growers” and works “proactively with growers and industry to avoid potential conflicts.” Syngenta said Enogen is grown in a closed-loop system with contracted growers that follow a comprehensive stewardship program to prevent commingling. For example, Syngenta developed a purple tracer that offers growers a visual way to ensure grain is properly segregated from planting to delivery.

Ron Lowery, an expert in crop nutrition and management, says Syngenta is working to be good stewards of Enogen corn. But he also says that the GMO corn “has negative possibilities for non-GMO and organic corn growers and for the baking and milling industry.”

Despite indications pointing to Enogen as the problem, tests have not yet confirmed the presence of Enogen corn in Amapola’s flour.    READ MORE  and MORE (Energy.AgWired.com)

 

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