Advanced Biofuels USA: promoting the understanding, development and use of advanced biofuels around the world.

Call to Action for a Truly Sustainable Renewable Future
August 8, 2013 – 5:07 pm | No Comment

-Include high octane/high ethanol Regular Grade fuel in EPA Tier 3 regulations.
-Use a dedicated, self-reducing non-renewable carbon user fee to fund renewable energy R&D.
-Start an Apollo-type program to bring New Ideas to sustainable biofuel and …

Read the full story »
Business News/Analysis

Federal Legislation

Political news and views from Capitol Hill.

More Coming Events

Conferences and Events List in Addition to Coming Events Carousel (above)

Original Writing, Opinions Advanced Biofuels USA

Sustainability

Home » Algae/Other Aquatic Organisms/Seaweed, Feedstocks, Florida

Can Blue-Green Algae Be Used as Biofuel?

Submitted by on August 2, 2018 – 5:27 pmNo Comment

by Ross DiMattei (ABC-7)  Suspending freshwater releases from Lake Okeechobee is only a temporary solution to the water quality issues in Southwest Florida.  —  You may have seen a proposal for a more permanent solution circulating on social media that would involve converting the blue-green algae into biofuel.

ABC-7 spoke with a research professor who said that is an option, but not a realistic one.

“All algae are potentially biofuel,” said Dr. Bill Louda, a research professor at Florida Atlantic University.

Louda has studied the water and algae exiting Lake Okeechobee, and he said in order to harvest it for fuel, “you’ve got to basically get tons of it.”
 
He said you would need to extract it from the water using a tool that hasn’t been invented yet.
 

After harvesting the algae, Louda said the final step would involve turning it into fuel. He argued the price of the process makes it an unrealistic option.

“It’s an extremely expensive proposition,” Louda said.

Louda added that even if there were a way to extract all this algae from our waterways, this type of algae is very toxic and low in lipids, or fatty acids, making it some of the worst algae to try and turn into biofuel.  READ MORE

Related Post

Tags: , ,

Comments are closed.