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Call to Action for a Truly Sustainable Renewable Future
August 8, 2013 – 5:07 pm | No Comment

-Include high octane/high ethanol Regular Grade fuel in EPA Tier 3 regulations.
-Use a dedicated, self-reducing non-renewable carbon user fee to fund renewable energy R&D.
-Start an Apollo-type program to bring New Ideas to sustainable biofuel and …

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Home » Algae/Other Aquatic Organisms/Seaweed, Farming/Growing, Feedstock, Feedstocks, Infrastructure, R & D Focus, Sustainability, UK (United Kingdom), University/College Programs

Study Shows Seaweed Succumbs to Viruses

Submitted by on August 11, 2017 – 10:49 amNo Comment

(Phys.Org/University of Plymouth)   Scientists are warning the UK kelp biofuel industry to beware of viruses. Whilst known to infect certain types of seaweed, a new study published in the ISME Journal is the first to describe viruses in kelps, which are important both ecologically and commercially.

Researchers from the Marine Biological Association (MBA) and University of Plymouth examined Laminaria and Saccharina kelps commonly occurring around the British Isles, and which include target species for the emerging kelp biofuel industry. They detected viruses by searching at the molecular level for their DNA ‘fingerprint’, and their presence was confirmed by observation of symptoms of infection using conventional and electron microscopy.

In the field, these viruses were found to have infected two thirds of their host populations; however, their biological impact remains unknown and the authors warn that this unexplored pool of viruses could have unexpected effects in cultivation conditions.

The kelp species examined were oar weed (Laminaria digitata), Northern kelp or cuvie (Laminaria hyperborea) and sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima). READ MORE

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